DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2320-6012.ijrms20222543
Published: 2022-09-27

Potential use of glucosamine, chondroitine, chitosan and phytoestrogen for patients with osteoarthritis

Putu Kermawan, Made Bramantya Karna, I. Made Jawi, Nyoman Kertia, Ketut Shri Satya Wiwekananda, Ketut Shri Satya Yogananda

Abstract


The burden of musculoskeletal disease has increased significantly to become the second leading cause of YLD (years of life with disability). Osteoarthritis (OA) therapy that is often given is ibuprofen (NSAID) often give side effects. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct a literature review to explore evidence of how much potential these materials have for treating OA. The literature review was conducted on four databases, e.g., Pubmed, Scopus, Science direct, Clinical Key. We used several keywords to find each topic of discussion. Topic 1, benefits of glucosamine chondroitine; topic 2, benefits of chitosan; topic 3, benefits of phytoestrogens. Data from included studies were then extracted. Obtained data were analyzed using descriptive statistical methods. Glucosamine-chondroitin had a significant effect in reducing pain, reducing inflammation, reducing the rate of joint space narrowing and helping to improve joint function in OA patients with long-term use. Furthermore, the potential of chitosan can help bone remodeling, reduce pain, and inflammation. Besides, phytoestrogens also have the potential to increase bone mineral density, reducing the rate of bone turnover and reduce the occurrence of obesity through its anti-cholesterol effects. The complexity of the mechanism of action given, ranging from preventing the biggest risk factor, namely obesity; treating the main causes such as inflammation and cartilage damage; and also to treating the symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness. In the future, it is necessary to conduct clinical trials study using the ingredients glucosamine, chondroitin, chitosan and phytoestrogens to treat patients with OA.


Keywords


Osteoarthritis therapy, Joint arthritis, Joint inflammation therapy

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