Systematic review and meta-analysis of biomarker proinflammation of depression in traumatic brain injury

Authors

  • Andisty Ate Department of Neurology, Medical Faculty of Sam Ratulangi University/ Prof. Dr. R. D. Kandou General Hospital, Manado, Indonesia
  • Windy Wariki Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Sam Ratulangi, Manado, Indonesia
  • Finny Warouw Department of Neurology, Medical Faculty of Sam Ratulangi University/ Prof. Dr. R. D. Kandou General Hospital, Manado, Indonesia Neurorestoration Consultant, Memory and Neurorestoration Clinic, Manado, Indonesia
  • Junita Maja Pertiwi Department of Neurology, Medical Faculty of Sam Ratulangi University/ Prof. Dr. R. D. Kandou General Hospital, Manado, Indonesia Neurobehavioral Consultant, Head of Memory and Neurorestoration Clinic, Manado, Indonesia

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/2320-6012.ijrms20223653

Keywords:

Depression in TBI, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α

Abstract

Depression is one of the long-term complications of traumatic brain injury (TBI) associated with the inflammatory process. This study aims to analyze the role of proinflammatory biomarkers on depression due to TBI and determine the types of proinflammatory biomarkers of depression in TBI. This systematic review and meta-analysis used the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) protocol with the population, intervention, comparison, outcome method. The selected research articles consisted of 4 cohort studies and 2 cross-sectional studies. Participants were all participants who experienced TBI without any previous infectious disease and neurobehavior disorders. Article searches are limited to the last 10 years using digital libraries including Pubmed, Science Direct, Wiley, Google Scholar. Assessment of the risk of bias using the ROBINS-1 tool, research quality using the GradePro application, and meta-analysis using review manager software 5.4.1. The results of a meta-analysis of proinflammatory biomarkers of depression using 2 cross-sectional studies showed a risk of bias and a moderate level of certainty. The most common types of proinflammatory biomarkers are IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-10. These proinflammatory biomarkers are markers of depression in TBI and have an effect on depression in TBI, especially in recurrent TBI and high post-traumatic stress disorder with depression accompanied by an increase in the concentration value of these biomarkers. Increased proinflammatory biomarkers IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-10 were found in depression with TBI. This proinflammatory biomarker has a significant relationship so that it can be used as a marker of depression in TBI.

Author Biographies

Andisty Ate, Department of Neurology, Medical Faculty of Sam Ratulangi University/ Prof. Dr. R. D. Kandou General Hospital, Manado, Indonesia

Neurology department, Sam Ratulangi University

Windy Wariki, Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Sam Ratulangi, Manado, Indonesia

Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Sam Ratulangi, Manado, Indonesia

Finny Warouw, Department of Neurology, Medical Faculty of Sam Ratulangi University/ Prof. Dr. R. D. Kandou General Hospital, Manado, Indonesia Neurorestoration Consultant, Memory and Neurorestoration Clinic, Manado, Indonesia

Consultant of Neurorestoration, Memory Clinic and Neurorestoration, Neurology Department – Medical Faculty of Sam Ratulangi University/ Prof.Dr.R.D.Kandou General Hospital, Manado, Indonesia

Junita Maja Pertiwi, Department of Neurology, Medical Faculty of Sam Ratulangi University/ Prof. Dr. R. D. Kandou General Hospital, Manado, Indonesia Neurobehavioral Consultant, Head of Memory and Neurorestoration Clinic, Manado, Indonesia

Consultant of Neurobehavior. Head of Memory and Neurorestoration Clinic, Neurology Department – Medical Faculty of Sam Ratulangi University

References

James SL. Global, regional, and national burden of traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury, 1990-2016: A systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016. Lancet Neurol. 2019;18:56-87.

Riskesdas. Hasil Utama Riskesdas 2018. Kementrian Kesehatan RI. Available at: https://kesmas.kemkes.go.id/assets/upload/dir519d41d8cd98f00/files/Hasil-riskesdas-2018_1274.pdf. 2018. Accessed on 1 No, 2022.

Bodnar CN, Morganti JM, Bachstetter AD. Depression following a traumatic brain injury: Uncovering cytokine dysregulation as a pathogenic mechanism. Neural Regeneration Res. 2018;13:1693-704.

Lavoie S, Sechrist S, Quach N, Ehsanian R, Duong T, Gotlib IH et al. Depression in men and women one year following traumatic brain injury (TBI): A TBI model systems study. Front Psychol. 2017;8.

Köhler-Forsberg O. Association between C-reactive protein (CRP) with depression symptom severity and specific depressive symptoms in major depression. Brain Behav Immun. 2017;62:344-50.

Juengst SB, Kumar RG, Wagner AK. A narrative literature review of depression following traumatic brain injury: Prevalence, impact, and management challenges. Psychol Res Behav Management. 2017;10:175-86.

Van der Horn HJ. An integrated perspective linking physiological and psychological consequences of mild traumatic brain injury. J Neurol. 2020;267:2497-506.

Riggio S. Traumatic Brain Injury and Its Neurobehavioral Sequelae. Neurol Clin. 2011;29(1):35-47.

Schwarzbold M. Psychiatric disorders and traumatic brain injury. Neuropsych Dis Treat. 2008;4:797-816.

Moher D, Liberati A, Tetzlaff J, Altman DG, Group TP. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. The PRISMA Statement. 2009;6.

PRISMA Flow Diagram. 2020. Available at: http://prisma-statement.org/prismastatement/flow diagram.aspx. Accessed on 26 Oct, 2022.

Sterne JAC, Hernán MA, Reeves BC, Savović J, Berkman ND, Viswanathan M et al. Risk Of Bias In Non-randomized Studies of Interventions (ROBINS-I): detailed guidance. BMJ. 2016;355:i4919.

McGuinness LA, Higgins JPT. Risk‐of‐bias VISualization (robvis): An R package and Shiny web app for visualizing risk‐of‐bias assessments. Res Synth Methods. 2021;12:55-61.

Schünemann H, Broźek J, Guyatt G, Oxman A. 2013. GRADE handbook. Available at: https://training.cochrane.org/resource/grade-handbook. Accessed on 26 Oct, 2022.

Li G, Zeng J, Tian J, Levine MAH, Thabane L. Multiple uses of forest plots in presenting analysis results in health research. J Clin Epidemiol. 2020;117.

Review Manager (RevMan) Computer program. Version 5.4. The Cochrane Collaboration, 2020.

Sun Y, Bai L, Niu X, Wang Z, Yin B, Bai G, Zhang D et al. Elevated serum levels of inflammation-related cytokines in mild traumatic brain injury are associated with cognitive performance. Front Neurol. 2019;10:1-9.

Vedantam A. Early versus Late Profiles of Inflammatory Cytokines after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Their Association with Neuropsychological Outcomes. J Neurotrauma. 2021;38.

Devoto C, Arcurio L, Fetta J, Ley M, Rodney T, Kanefsky R et al. Inflammation Relates to Chronic Behavioral and Neurological Symptoms in Military Personnel with Traumatic Brain Injuries. Cell Transplant. 2017;26:1169-77.

Rodney T, Taylor P, Dunbar K, Perrin N, Lai C, Roy M, Gill J et al. High IL-6 in military personnel relates to multiple traumatic brain injuries and post-traumatic stress disorder. Behav Brain Res. 2020;392:112715.

Juengst SB, Kumar RG, Failla MD, Goyal A, Wagner AK. Acute inflammatory biomarker profiles predict depression risk following moderate to severe traumatic brain injury. J Head Trauma Rehabil. 2015;30:207-18.

Juengst SB, Kumar RG, Arenth PM, Wagner AK. Exploratory associations with Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, disinhibition and suicidal endorsement after traumatic brain injury. Brain Behav Immun. 20014;41:134-43.

Juengst SB, Kumar RG, Failla MD, Goyal A, Wagner AK. Acute Inflammatory Biomarker Profiles Predict Depression Risk Following Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury. J Head Trauma Rehabil. 2015;30:207-18.

Su SH. Elevated C-reactive protein levels may be a predictor of persistent unfavourable symptoms in patients with mild traumatic brain injury: A preliminary study. Brain Behav Immun. 2014;38:111-7.

Cochrane. RevMan 5.4 User Guide. 2020;4:1-175.

Nishuty NL. Evaluation of Serum Interleukin-6 and C-reactive Protein Levels in Drug-naïve Major Depressive Disorder Patients. Cureus. 2019;3868.

Miranda HC, Nunes SOV, Reiche EMV, Oda JMM, Watanabe MAE. Higher than normal plasma Iinterleukin-6 concentrations in brazilian patients with mood disorders. Brazilian Arch Biol Technol. 2011;54:717-22.

Tao H. Changes of Serum Melatonin, Interleukin-6, Homocysteine, and Complement C3 and C4 Levels in Patients With Depression. Front Psychol. 2020;11:1-7.

Dowlati Y, Herrmann N, Swardfager W, Liu H, Sham L, Reim EK et al. A Meta-Analysis of Cytokines in Major Depression. Biol Psychiatr. 2010;67:446-57.

Lindqvist D. Oxidative stress, inflammation and treatment response in major depression. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2017;76:197-205.

Jensen J. Depression and inflammation, the role of inflammatory biomarkers in the pathogenesis of depression. 2019.

Krishnadas R, Cavanagh J. Depression: An inflammatory illness? J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatr. 2012;83:495-502.

Perry DC, Sturm VE, Peterson MJ, Pieper CF, Bullock T, Boeve BF et al. Association of traumatic brain injury with subsequent neurological and psychiatric disease: A meta-analysis. J Neurosurg. 2016;124:511-26.

Downloads

Published

2022-12-30

How to Cite

Ate, A., Wariki, W., Warouw, F., & Pertiwi, J. M. (2022). Systematic review and meta-analysis of biomarker proinflammation of depression in traumatic brain injury. International Journal of Research in Medical Sciences, 11(1), 289–301. https://doi.org/10.18203/2320-6012.ijrms20223653

Issue

Section

Meta-Analysis