A study of habit of fast food eating among school going adolescents and parental advice and its relation with their nutritional status

Mukesh Vir Singh, D. K. Singh, R. K. Yadav, K. M. Shukla, I. K. Sharma, N. C. Prajapati

Abstract


Background:A study of habit of fast food eating among school going adolescents and parental advice and its relation with their nutritional status.

Methods: Design: an epidemiological analytic observational study. Subjects: 600 adolescents’ 15-19 years of age, studying in 11 and 12 classes and included both boys and girls. A single observer interviewed each student and gathered the information regarding their eating habits. It was recorded on a pre-tested open and closed ended Performa. Nutritional status was assessed by BMI. The adolescents for the purpose of analysis were broadly grouped in two groups. Group I (those having normal BMI ranging 18.5 to 25) and group II (Malnourished i.e. those having BMI <18.5 to >25). Group II adolescents were further divided into group IIa (Underweight, BMI<18.5) and group IIb is (Over weight and obese BMI >25).

Results:Adolescents who took both fast food and soft drinks 73.1% were malnourished (group II) as compared to those who did not take both the things 13.7% in group II. Difference was found to be statistically significant (p value <0.01). Out of 73.1% who took both fast food and soft drinks 62.1% and 11.0% were in group IIa (Underweight, BMI <18.5) and group IIb (Over weight and obese BMI >25) subsequently. Incidence of malnutrition was significantly less in 12.4% adolescents’ interfered by their parents as compared to 69.6% of those where parents was not interfering. Difference was found to be statistically significant (P value <0.01).

Conclusion: A habit of fast food eating and taking soft drink provokes malnutrition. Interference in eating by parents is beneficial among adolescents.

 


Keywords


Fast food eating, BMI, Adolescents, Malnutrition

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References


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