DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2320-6012.ijrms20171231

The relationship between ABO blood groups and gene mutations frequently observed in Familial Mediterranean Fever

Hatice Terzi, Ali Şahin, Can Hüzmeli, Ahmet Kerim Türesin, Gökhan Bağci, Mehmet Şencan

Abstract


Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the genetic mutations, which are frequently detected and known to cause familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) disease, with ABO blood groups.

Methods: There were 271 patients with FMF diagnosis and 271 healthy control subject enrolled in the study. The medical files of each case were screened retrospectively and demographic characteristics, genetic mutations, and ABO blood groups were recorded.

Results: No statistically significant difference was detected between the two groups with respect to their gender and age (p>0/05). When patient and healthy control groups were compared based on ABO blood groups, the study groups were observed to differ significantly with respect to B blood group (p=0.008). In the patient group, a considerable relationship could not have been found when the gene mutations were compared based on blood groups, either for E148Q (n=64) and M694V (n=142) genes (p>0.05). However, a considerable difference was observed for V726A (n=58) gene; B blood group was more frequently observed among those who were detected to have V726A mutation (p=0.022).

Conclusions: In present study cohort, blood type B was more frequent among FMF patients. We observed that there could be a significant association between V726A mutation and ABO blood groups.

Keywords


Blood groups, Familial Mediterranean fever, Genetic mutation

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