DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2320-6012.ijrms20183654

Isobaric levobupivacaine a better and safer substitute for spinal anaesthesia in patients undergoing prolonged lower abdominal and lower limb surgeries

Wasimul Hoda, Abhishek Kumar, Priodarshi Roychoudhury

Abstract


Background: Bupivacaine being the drug of choice for spinal anaesthesia is associated with serious cardiac toxicity. Levobupivacaine and ropivacaine, both being the two S enantiomers of bupivacaine can be a safer alternatives with better cardiovascular safety. Hence, the clinical efficacy of both were assessed and compared in patients undergoing spinal anesthesia.

Methods: A prospective randomized controlled double blind study was done in 68 adult posted for elective lower abdominal and lower limb surgeries under spinal anesthesia. They were randomized into 2 groups. About 3ml isobaric levobupivacaine 0.5% (15mg) was given in group A and 3ml isobaric ropivacaine 0.5% (15mg) was given in group B. Onset, duration of sensory and motor blocks, time for maximum sensory and motor block, time for 2 segment sensory regression and haemodynamic parameters were recorded and analyzed.

Results: All patients achieved a sensory block of T10 dermatome. Onset of sensory blockade at T10 was similar in both groups, group A (5.71±1.31min) and group B (5.94±1.72min). Time from injection to two dermatomal regression was 129.68±15.54min in group A and 111.38±22.35min in group B. Onset of Bromage score of 1 in group A was 4.68±1.27min and in group B was 6.44±1.64min. The mean duration of motor and complete motor block was prolonged in group A patients (197.74±18.51min, 168.82±17.90 min) as compared to group B (131.88±20.41min, 106.71±10.85min).

Conclusions: Isobaric levobupivacaine was found to be a better and safer substitute for spinal anesthesia in patients undergoing prolonged lower abdominal and lower limb surgeries.


Keywords


Intrathecal Anaesthesia, Isobaric, Levobupivacaine, Lower abdominal Surgery, Lower Limb Surgery, Ropivacaine

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