DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2320-6012.ijrms20190995

A study of serum lipid profile in smokers and non-smokers: evaluation of role of smoking on lipid profile

Chandrashekar V. Kubihal, Hemalatha D. Naik

Abstract


Background: Several studies have reported elevated blood cholesterol levels among persons who regularly smoke cigarettes and lowered blood cholesterol levels among persons quitting smoking. Other studies have also shown that smoking lowers high density lipoprotein level, resulting in an increased risk of coronary heart disease. Smoking also leads to increase in LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels. The objective was to study serum lipid profile in smokers and non-smokers.

Methods: A cross sectional comparative study was carried in 100 subjects. The subjects were divided into two groups. First group consisted of 25 nonsmokers and second group of 75 smokers. The group of 75 smokers was again divided into three equal sub groups of 25 each depending upon the duration and intensity of smoking. Concentration of serum total cholesterol and HDL was determined by Zak’s method. Concentration of serum LDL and VLDL cholesterol was determined by Friedwald’s formula. Concentration of serum triglyceride level was determined by enzymatic end point peroxidase coupled method.

Results: All the values of lipid profile i.e., total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL, VLDL were found to be significantly higher among the smokers compared to the non-smokers. HDL value was significantly lower among smokers. As the degree of smoking increased from mild to heavy smokers, the values of total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL and VLDL increased. The degree of smoking was inversely proportional to HDL values i.e., the HDL value decreased as the smoking degree increased.

Conclusions: Thus, it can be said based on the present study that smoking affects and deranges the lipid profile of the person.


Keywords


HDL, LDL, Total cholesterol, Triglycerides, VLDL

Full Text:

PDF

References


McGill HC. The cardiovascular pathology of smoking. Am Heart J. 1988;115(1):250-7.

Stringer MD, Görög PG, Freeman A, Kakkar VV. Lipid peroxides and atherosclerosis. BMJ. 1989;298(6669):281-4.

Anand MP, Bakhle DS, Ajay S. Smoking and hypertension: Indian scenario. J Assoc Physicians Ind. 1990;38(4):283-4.

Muscat JE, Harris RE, Haley NJ, Wynder EL. Cigarette smoking and plasma cholesterol. Am Heart J. 1991;121(1):141-7.

Sinha AK, Misra GC, Patel DK. Effect of cigarette smoking on lipid profile in the young. J Assoc Physicians Ind. 1995;43(3):185-8.

Tilawani RK. Effect of smoking on lipid profile. J Assoc Physicians Ind. 1997;45:551-2.

Drexel H, Amann FW, Beran J, Rentsch K, Candinas R, Muntwyler J, et al. Coronary Heart Disease/myocardial Infarction: plasma triglycerides and three lipoprotein cholesterol fractions are independent predictors of the extent of coronary atherosclerosis. Circul. 1994;90(5):2230-5.

Biswas PK, Dasbiswas A, Roy S, Roy D, Biswas A, Chatterjee SS, et al. Risk factors and angiographic profile of coronary artery disease in young. J Ind Med Assoc. 1995;93(3):90-2.

Mjøs OD. Lipid effects of smoking. Am Heart J. 1988;115(1):272-5.

Craig WY, Palomaki GE, Haddow JE. Cigarette smoking and serum lipid and lipoprotein concentrations: an analysis of published data. BMJ. 1989;298(6676):784-8.

Rastogi R, Shrivastava SS, Mehrotra TN, Singh VS, Gupta MK. Lipid profile in smokers. J Assoc Physicians Ind. 1989;37(12):764-6.

Miller NE, Hammett F, Saltissi S, Rao S, Van Zeller H, Coltart J, et al. Relation of angiographically defined coronary artery disease to plasma lipoprotein subfractions and apolipoproteins. Brit Med J. 1981;282(6278):1741-4.